A Lady and A Sniper

To me, there’s something pleasingly incongruous in this image made available by the British Library.  Taken from a work called “The Book of Ballads Ancient and Modern” it shows a lady in quite formal evening wear sighting a crossbow.  Looks like the perfect character for a 6d6 villain.

There are two threads to the character, the lady and the sniper.  Duchess Elise Katherine Wells grew up wealthy, spoilt and bored.  After inheriting her father’s estate, she’s left it in the care of a minor noble tenant.  Travelling Europe in search of something to do, her carriage was attacked by a highwayman. Grabbing a crossbow in self defence she shot him dead.  The thrill of violence was intoxicating.  Since then she’s been an assassin for hire, working through hidden contacts and hiding in plain sight.  No-one would suspect a lady such as her of being a merciless killer.  Lady Wells is utterly lacking in morals and merrily kills both innocents and children.

As an upper class lady, Lady Wells is both [Privileged] and accustomed to [City Life].  She’s arrogance, healthy and has quick wits to help her navigate high society.  Over time she’s become cosmopolitan using her contacts, family wealth, social status and skill with fashion as she’s climbed the social ladder.  It is her favourite ploy to attend a party held in the honour of her target.

Nearly a decade of killing has made Lady Well an expert [Marksman] and [Hunter]. Cunning, Manual Dexterity and Sharp Eyes are her life advantages from these paths. Alert, Move and Shoot, Precise Shot, Silent, Snap Shot and Weapon Expertise are her skills.  She has many opportunity advantages, allowing her to retain the element of surprise even after she’s caught in combat.  To support this, she has 4 static potential.  Overall, Lady Wells is a dangerous opponent.

Character Sheet [https://6d6rpg.com/wiki/doku.php?id=open:monsters:thinktank:ladywells]


Image Credit: Image taken from page 432 of ‘The Book of Ballads Ancient and Modern. With illustrations’ from the British Library – No Copyright