Does This Cover Work For You?

This is the latest cover for 6d6 Hellenic, what do you think?https://6d6rpg.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/Portobellos-old-phonebox-by-Andrew-Girdwood.jpg
As our books evolve from ideas to finished works, so do the covers. We always create a quick and dirty cover when starting a book to give us a visual to associate with the work. As the book fills out we upgrade the cover, often going through several different versions until we settle on the image for the final book.

This cover uses a painting from Goya called Saturn Devouring His Son which shows the Titan Cronus eating his children, one of which, Zeus manages to escape and later overthrows his father and gives birth to the Hellenic period.

These are the two previous working covers.

Original 6d6 Hellenic

Original “anything will do” cover

HellenicTempCover

Put together for the Kickstarter

What do you think of the new cover?

4 comments

  1. The Perseus cover is beautiful, but the naked Andromeda could be rather off-putting to some. Even though Goya’s Saturn is one of my favorite paintings, it definitely lacks a Hellenic feel. I mean, if you’re planning on running it as a Greek-themed survival horror, it might work. The style of the “anything goes” does the most toward evoking Hellenism; well, or Mycenaeaism, at least. Similar art in that style could definitely evoke either a Mycenaean or a post-Dorian renaissance feel, depending on what you’re going for. Unless you’re going for a Classical Greek feel, in which case a Lazlo Matulay style doodle of Aeschylus kneeing Euripides in the groin would be awesome.

    1. The imagery of the male hero rescuing the defenseless maiden in the Perseus / Andromeda is problematic and one of the reasons I unhappy with that art. The Goya piece is striking and powerful but doesn’t match most people’s ideas of Hellenic.

      Which illustrates the problems we are having settling on a cover. Most of the Greek myths and associated art have gender issues, something we have avoided in the game while lots of the art isn’t heroic enough. Quite a lot also doesn’t fit are publishing needs in terms of layout.

      Thanks for the tips. We will continue our hunt for the perfect cover.

      Chris

      1. This may be an instance where you might need to find or commission something ‘retro’ to meet your goals. Again, I’m strongly in favor of the Mycenaean black on white/tan style portraying heroic scenes, particularly since that period in art is contemporary with what could be best referred to as the “mythic age” of ancient Greece.

        Greek mythology is ALWAYS going to be problematic from the perspective that you mention. One could dance around it, avoid it all together, or acknowledge and accept it. The easiest way to acknowledge and accept it, I’d think, from an art design perspective, at any rate, is to avoid any sort of neo-classical interpretation and use period representation whenever possible. This also might mean not using classical Greek representations either, as by the 5th century, the myths had been pretty bowdlerized; for instance, by the time of ancient Greece we’re most familiar with, Hercules had been transformed from awesome epic hero to the period equivalent of a Seth MacFarlane dad character.

        1. 6d6 Hellenic is actually set in the around 370BC, a long time after the original heroic age. The sub-title is ‘A New Age Of Heroes’ as the gods return to directly meddle in the affairs of mortals once more. It is neither the classic Homeric vision of ancient Greece nor the historical Greece of the time. This approach makes it a lot easier to simply ignore the worst of the Greek cultural baggage and giving the writers and players more of a free reign.

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